TAKE ACTION

PROJECTS OF THE ICS – IT IS SO IMPORTANT NOT TO BLAME BUT TO UNDERSTAND

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Speaking to the local people is essencial!

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Interviewing and informing local people is essential and a part of the work of the ICS


MARITA

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EVERY YEAR ON THE 31ST OF AUGUST A CHEETAH DAY TAKES PLACE TO SPREAD AWARENESS.
ICS-awarenessThe ICS holds presentations to create understanding.

Informing children is essential for the future!

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WHY DO RESEARCH?

A mother is hiding in her little dent made of grass in the woodlands with her new born cubs. Not a place where you would expect a cheetah. But a great place to hide she figured.

No villages with people nearby and no other predators who could be a threat. The wild boars are having their own offspring so food is not a problem. It is spring and water is not far. Everything seems to be perfect. But something is not right. It smells strange. There is danger … it is a poacher.

Without knowledge about where cheetahs live the wrong areas will be protected by gamekeepers. An easy catch for a poachers. Areas where cheetahs bring up their cubs and where prey live can be better protected.

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Cheetah mothers are very cautious when they have their cubs


CAMERA TRAPS

Members of the ICS install camera traps on places where cheetahs live to find out more about their behaviour.

One day they managed to take pictures of cheetahs being active at night. But what did they do? Isn’t it known that cheetahs don’t hunt at night to avoid other predators in the same territory? Because they do, it leads one to suspect that they hunt small rodents which are nocturnal. If that snack is worth the effort is still not clear, but a step closer to understanding.

How does a camera trap work?

Camera traps are remotely activated cameras that is equipped with a motion sensor or an infrared sensor. They are activated by this sensor when body heat or movement from an animal is detected. Day and night these cameras provide a glimpse into a previously unseen behaviour of some of the most endangered species on Earth.


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A large family near Turkmenistan border taken by a camera trap.

This female cheetah must be an experienced mom, successfully raised all her three cubs to the age of one. It is surprising how this large group survived among herds of livestock who have traditional grazing permissions within the area’s pastures in winters.

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A camera trap of the ICS

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Cheetah at night. Picture taken by a camera trap.

The great advantage of camera trapping is that they can record very accurate data without the animal being captured. They minimally disturb wildlife and can replace the use of more invasive survey and monitoring techniques such as live trap and release.


RESEARCH WORK

leopard-scullICS members measuring a scull and compare it with other datas.

Without proven knowledge it is difficult to do anything meaningful for the conservation of the species. 

ICS-OfficePublishing results

For more information about projects and the scientists who work with cheetahs and other animals in Iran please have a look at the

ICS WEBSITE